Tag Archives: The Next 15 Minutes

We’re ALL Winners: Free E-Books, The Next 15 Minutes

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Today I’m celebrating. My memoir, The Next 15 Minutes, has been honored by the North American Snowsports Journalists Association (NASJA) with the Harold Hirsch award for excellence in journalism in the Book category. The Next 15 Minutes, if you’re new here, is the high-octane story of how lessons learned as a ski patroller helped me get through my husband’s harrowing cancer diagnosis. More adventure-story than medical-memoir, this book reveals what it’s like to make the ski industry your life and how to use our voluntary adventures to get through real-life disasters. I’ve always believed that we get out on the edge to see what we’re made of. But we don’t expect to use that expertise in a real emergency. Until we have no other choice.

If you haven’t yet read the book, now’s the time.

Harold_Hirsch

Thanks NASJA!

The Book category is only given every three years. Judges are chosen based on their expertise in the field, and are not members of the organization. The award is named for Harold Hirsch, a long-time ski journalist, and member of the NASJA Board.

I’m thrilled to be honored by NASJA. My late father-in-law, Everett Kircher, was given NASJA’s Lifetime Achievement Award in Mammoth, CA in 1999.

My husband and his brother, Steve, accepted the honor in their father’s name. It’s fitting that I received my award in Mammoth 14 years later.

To celebrate, my publisher, Behler Publications, is giving away free e-books of THE NEXT 15 MINUTES today and tomorrow. Just email Lynn Price at: lynn_at_behlerpublications.com (replace “_at_” with @ symbol) and put FREE NEXT 15 MINUTES in the Subject line. Hurry. This special celebration ends tomorrow.

Yea!

Join Me for a Book Reading This Friday

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I will be reading from my book, The Next 15 Minutes this Friday June 29th, 2012 in Redmond, Washington at the RASP (Redmond Association of Spoken Word) monthly event. It starts at 7pm at the Old Redmond Schoolhouse Community Center (16600 NE 80th Street).

If you’re in the area, please come and have a listen. I will also be signing and selling books and trying to find a passage that I can real aloud without *crying.

 

*Little known fact about me: I have yet to make it through a reading without cracking, which is why I rarely read and more often do a slideshow, which I have perfected to a science. Don’t ask me why I agreed to do this. I was probably drunk.

P.S. Don’t let this last sentence scare you away. Watching me cry can actually be a fun way to spend a Friday night. Trust me on this one.

Should You Keep Your Joy to Yourself?

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This is the moment to feel joy

As I stood at my locker the other day after skiing, a fellow ski patroller said to me, “So I hear you’ve been skiing powder?” He paused while I nodded. Before I could continue he said, “I don’t want to hear about it.”

I smiled and nodded. “Okay.” I turned back towards my locker, switched off my avalanche beacon and stored it next to my radio.

“I mean,” he said. “I know where you’ve been.”

I shifted around. “I thought you didn’t want to hear about it.”

He smiled and admitted that he kind of did want to know about skiing in Japan, and had heard that I’d recently been to Big Sky.

“I drove up to Cypress yesterday for a book signing and got back at midnight,” I told him, unclipping my helmet. “I didn’t even bring my skis.” I hung my head a little hoping to invoke a little pity. “I had to drink one of those 5 Hour Energy things I picked up at a gas station just to stay awake.”

Life is fleeting

“But you were in Japan.” He said flatly.

“Yes”

“And?” He smirked. It was killing him.

“And it was awesome.”

“I thought so.” Satisfied, he turned away.

Hiding your joy is funny business. Sometimes it seems the right thing to do. Whenever I tell another patroller about a recent trip, I emphasize the travel time and the pain-in-the-neck parts of it. I remind them that John and I actually flew for two days in order to ski for two days in Japan. Most people wouldn’t do that. It’s not all face shots and glory, I say.

But it was awesome? They want to know. And I tell them, yes, it was awesome. Some people don’t want the details; they just want to keep the flame burning on their own desire.

People wonder if writing a book is that way. I’m hesitant to say that yes, sharing my story is incredibly validating. I rarely mention that becoming an author has always been on my list of best-case-scenarios. That it is something I’ve dreamed about, imagining my book out there in the world. Instead, I tell them that it’s not all it’s cracked up to be. It’s hard to keep putting yourself out there (which is true), waving your book in the air like an idiot, hoping someone will buy a copy.

I tell people that it’s a heck of a lot easier to sell lift tickets than books. People feel guilty about books they don’t read. To buy a book and let it sit unread on the shelf brings some people great angst. I half joke and tell them they don’t have to read it, they just have to buy it. I talk about remainders until I notice their eyes glass over.

Yesterday I skied powder at Crystal. It was a surprising day–one where the “Real Feel”™ of the 3 inches of reported new snow was more like 10 inches. I hiked the King and found untouched snow in Silver Basin. After my first turn in, I realized I wasn’t smiling. I was thinking about how much time I had before I needed to be somewhere else.

I stopped.

Someone was skiing the chute to my left, and I caught glimpses of his blue jacket and silver helmet. The sun poked through the clouds and glistened on the trees to my right. I could hear only the wind and the soft beating of my heart. My blood softened a little, and I let myself melt a little into my surroundings.

I pushed on. This time I smiled big, letting the cold air freeze my teeth. I made wide arcs across the chute, certain the rocky ribs were covered in snow, and picked up speed. At the bottom another skier waited in the trees and I swooped past him, smiling and breathing loudly, taking large gulps of the snowy air.

As I skated out the long cat track, I kept on smiling. I noticed the way my legs pushed and my triceps worked and took joy in the movement of my body. I reminded myself that someday I would no longer be able to do this. Our best moments, like all moments, are temporary.

It’s no good trying to hide your joy. Life changes in an instant. This moment right here might be your last chance for joy. I say revel in it.

What do you say?

Live Radio Interview Today 1pm PT

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I’ll be on the radio today and you can listen in live and even call in with questions. Here’s the dope:

Book Signing at Crystal Mountain This Weekend

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I will be signing and selling books this Saturday, December 17th in the day lodge at Crystal Mountain. Come join me during the apres ski hour. If you already have a copy, bring it so I can sign it. And you can buy another one!  The Next 15 Minutes will make a great gift for those of you who went skiing instead of finishing up your holiday shopping. Just saying!

Hope to see you there!

Date: Saturday, December 17, 2011

Where: Crystal Mountain Day Lodge

Time: 3:00pm-5:00pm

 

Why I Ski Patrol: A Recent Interview in Which I Manage to Really Blab My Head Off

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I love this interview. Not only did Erin Michaels come to my house to film, she also let me blab my head off about my job, the mountains, my book and where I find inspiration. She’s a trooper. Thanks Erin.

Can Cat Videos Sell Books?

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Ever since my book came out, I’ve been aflurry (is that even a word?) with promotion and book-selling mojo. To be a successful author these days you pretty much have to sell the book yourself. And by sell the book, I mean press it into everyone’s hand that you’ve ever met and beg them to buy it.

The other day I saw a guy at Starbucks. He looked vaguely familiar.

“Hey, didn’t we know each other in fourth grade?” I asked him.

He looked at me and narrowed his eyes. “I don’t think so.”

“I do. I’m pretty sure. Mr. Rochester’s class? Margaret Mead Elementary?”

He shook his head and ordered a grande latte and turned to go.

“Oh, cuz I thought we knew each other. I was going to tell you about my new book.” I reached into my wallet for my business card.

“No thanks,” the guy backed away slowly, keeping his eyes on my card like it was a gun or something.

“You’re a writer?” The barista asked when I ordered my earl gray latte. She smiled at me with a pitying look.

“Yes! I just published a book,” I started to say. Then she turned on the machine and smiled vaguely through the hissing smoke. She wasn’t interested.

So when I came across this video over at The Bloggess, I thought they might be onto something here. Everyone likes cat videos. Maybe I should change my book trailer to a cat video. What do you guys think?