Category Archives: Skiing/Snowboarding

All-Woman Skiing Posse=Best Thing Ever

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As a woman and as a skier, I’m here to tell you something. Skiing with a group of ripping women is fun. It’s real fun. It’s pinch-yourself-in-your-thigh-cause-you’re-not-even-sure-life-is-supposed-to-be-this-fun kind of fun. I grew up chasing my older sister around the slopes, and so I know something else to be true. If those fellow skiers are just a little bit better than you (or a LOT better than you, let’s face it) your skills improve fast.

The old Chair 6, Christy and Kim

The old Chair 6, Christy and Kim

As a ski industry person, I want to promote women skiers. We are half the population for starters. Since last I checked skiing is more dudes than chicks, I’ve often wondered how to get more women into the sport. If I had a snowflake for every time I heard, “I used to ski, before I had kids,” then I’d have a full-blown powder day on my hands.

So what gives?

Lel Tone and Kim Kircher

Hanging with Lel Tone 

Maybe women just don’t know how much fun you can have on skis. Whether you’re skiing solo, taking the kids for a lap on the bunny hill, searching for powder with your husband/boyfriend/co-worker or slicing arcs across the groomers, skiing is just fun. Plain and simple.

Kim Kircher and Corinne Mariethoz

Me and Corinne 

But here’s another thing. This is a secret, so you’ll have to lean in close.

Skiing with women is even better. Don’t tell my husband I said that. No hard feelings JK, you’re a lot of fun too. But skiing with a posse of ladies makes me bolder. It makes me relish just a little longer in the sheer joy of the thing.

Don’t worry. I’m not going to get all poetic about the pure experience of the sport. We are still too far away from the start of the season to go there. But you get the gist.

Getting the Girls Out at Crystal Mountain

Getting the Girls Out at Crystal Mountain

This is why I’m looking forward to watching Unicorn Picnic’s Pretty Faces film. Lyndsey Dyer is on a mission to introduce more women to the sport. She spearheaded shejumps.org, an organization dedicated to increasing female participation in outdoor activities. Lyndsey hopes to provide women of all ages and abilities a, “source of inspiration through a unique look at what is possible when boundaries are broken, dreams captured and friendships cultivated.” Check out the trailer below and prepare to get inspired.

 

 

What’s So Cool About Gazex?

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Exciting, new avalanche control technology is coming to Crystal this season. Three Gazex exploders are currently being installed in Powder Bowl, and if you’re not familiar with the technology, you’ll have to trust me on this one. Gazex is cool.

Why?

Because nothing says all-caps AWESOME like a fiery ball of gas setting off an avalanche. That’s two Hollywood-style special effects for the price of one. Let’s call it the Powder Bowl Two-fer.

Gazex Explosion

So what is Gazex?

Here’s the official marketing speak from the maker’s of Gazex (T.A.S). website:

Gazex is a powerful, permanent remote avalanche control systems. Gazex operates without explosives: the blast is caused by the detonation of a propane and oxygen mixture. The exploders are connected to a central gas shelter capable of storing sufficient gas reserves for the entire season.

Essentially it breaks down like this: a few squirts (and by “squirts” I mean a highly scientific mixture) of propane and O2 are blended in the exploder tube and lit on fire. This is the kind of thing ten-year-old boys’ dreams are made of. A blast of fire explodes from the tip of the tube and points straight down at the snow. This, in turn, will start an avalanche if conditions are right. If not, just like with explosives AC (Avalanche Control), the slope is deemed safe enough to ride.

These exploders are permanent installations. For this reason, Gazex isn’t going to be replacing the ski patrol avalanche teams anytime soon (phew!). Instead, our goal is to use Gazex in places like PB and possibly Rock Face–avalanche paths that overhang heavily trafficked pistes. The Gazex exploders are triggered remotely, which means that the patrol can fire them off quickly and if the hazard ramps up during a storm.

Our Powder Bowl Gazex exploders won’t necessarily mean that Southback is going to open anytime sooner. But they will help us expedite our “in-area” Avalanche Control, keep our snowcat drivers safer and help to mitigate avalanche hazard in Powder Bowl.

Most importantly, Gazex is simply going to be cool to watch.

Blaine preparing concrete in Powder Bowl

Blaine preparing concrete in Powder Bowl

Lyndsey Dyer’s Story of the Skier Girl

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This is the time of year when ski and snowboard film producers start to put out teasers of upcoming films. Powder Magazine recently published a collection of the latest trailers (they’re calling it Trailer Park) and will be updating it  as new ones become available.

I’m especially excited about Pretty Faces, by Unicorn Picnic. This all-women film looks to be one of the best of the season. Check out the official trailer below.

 

The Film

Pretty Faces is a film celebrating women who thrive in the snow. The concept for the film was originated by professional big mountain skier and SheJumps co-founder, Lynsey Dyer with the objective of giving women and girls, young and old, a source of inspiration through a unique look at what is possible when boundaries are broken, dreams captured and friendships cultivated. In Lynsey’s words “I wanted to give young girls something positive to look up to…I wanted to give them their Blizzard of Ahhs, Ski Movie or High Life, but done in a way that also shows the elegance, grace, community and style that is unique to women in the mountains.”

Their Mission

Young girls need more positive role models to offer then an alternative to the world of skinny jeans, reality TV and fashion magazines. Unicorn Picnic aims to provide a positive source of inspiration for young girls first and foremost. The lessons learned on the mountain parallel those learned by many women who take the path less traveled. Their documentary ski film (Pretty Faces) will showcase women walking that path to deliver the message “If she can do it, then so can I.”

 

Crystal’s Hugh Gren Profiled in Powder Magazine

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Most of the people who read this blog probably already read Powder. Of course you do. But just in case you missed it, Crystal’s very own Hugh Gren was recently interviewed for a new series on Powder. The purpose of the series is for each interviewee to recommend the next one.

I recently ran into Hugh up on Chinook Pass, where he and a couple of other Crystal diehards were making the most of the remaining snow. They were taking turns shuttling each other to the top. I was riding my bike to the summit. It was Hugh’s turn to shuttle, and he stopped to cheer us on. And that’s a nice boost to get on those last few switchbacks from the summit. That’s just the kind of guy Hugh is. He may be a bit quirky and hyper, but above all else, Hugh has an infectious enthusiasm. He’s one of my favorite locals at Crystal.

Who did Hugh recommend for the next interview? Another Crystal favorite. But you’re going to have to read the article to find out.

Hugh Gren letting it all hang out on Chair 6

Hugh Gren letting it all hang out on Chair 6

Project Zero: An initiative to reduce avalanche fatalities

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projzerologoProject Zero, a collaborative effort by premiere avalanche forecasters and professionals in North America, is on a mission to reduce avalanche fatalities. Through crafting an effective safety message and a straightforward method for decision-making, they hope to educate all backcountry users to understand the risks in the backcountry and make better decisions to mitigate those risks.

This season, Project Zero launched Know the Snowa social media campaign that included a video contest aimed at engaging the lift-served backcountry skier and rider. You can find out more about the contest winners here

Crystal Mountain SouthbackLocal videographer Jacob Hase won fifth place for his video based at Crystal Mountain. On his vimeo page, Jacob describes the video as, “a day trip into the Crystal Mountain Washington back country with additional avalanche beacon training. Video is narrated by Crystal Mountain ski patroller Kim Kircher.”

As many of you know, Crystal Mountain is a great launching pad for backcountry terrain. Not only do we have the hike-to controlled Southback, but numerous true backcountry lines nearby as well.

Many of those lines can be accessed from the lifts. With the current phase of Project Zero focussing on lift-served backcountry, Crystal terrain is a perfect fit for Project Zero’s first initiative, and I’m honored to have been a part of it.

Congratulations Jacob!

 

Are Extreme Sports Too Risky?

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Each one of us has our own risk/reward calculus. Or perhaps we just weigh risk differently. Some people feel the sharp tang of risk just taking a stroll in the woods. Others can surf 30 foot waves or free-solo El Cap without breaking much of a sweat.

Chuck Patterson catches some air

Chuck Patterson catches some air

Regardless of where a person is on the risk continuum, others are always standing by to put that person in a box. Thrill-seekers take too many risks for their sport, say some. The risk-averse aren’t truly living, say others.

Since when did we care so much about the risks (or the lack thereof) that other people take?

The New York Times recently published an article about the risks in extreme sports. The author cites the soaring popularity of extreme sports and claims that, “many young people eager for an adrenaline rush are trying to copy their extreme sports idols, putting themselves at terrible risk.”

Injuries related to extreme sports are on the rise, and the participants are younger than ever. Overall, the author of the article urges participants to use safety equipment—especially helmets. The article quotes Dr. Sabesan, an orthopedic surgeon from Western Michigan School of Medicine, who recently presented her findings on a study about head and neck injuries in extreme sports. Her advice to parents of young rippers is to require “children who skateboard to wear a helmet and elbow and wrist guards.” She also recommends that snowboarders wear wrist guards and that the participants for other activities wear a helmet.

This debate has been going on for some time. Most people seem to agree that children should wear helmets, either because they are too young to decide for themselves or because they are too impulsive and tend to take bigger risks.

Motorcycle fatalities on the rise

Motorcycle fatalities on the rise

But what about adults? Should adults be required to wear a helmet while skiing or riding a motorcycle? Another recent article in New York Times cites a study that as motorcycle helmet laws are weakening, deaths are increasing.

Should we require helmets like we do seat belts? What about at ski areas? Legislated helmet use at ski areas is on the rise. Should we require our customers to strap on a helmet when they strap on their skis or board?

It would certainly help reduce head injuries.

But should we require it? Or should adults have the choice? I wear a helmet. But does that mean I make my friends wear one?

We’re all adults here. We should decide for ourselves. Even if helmet use could guarantee a safe landing, should we force people to wear one? I don’t know. I always get a little squeamish when I hear about requiring helmets.

Readers, what do you think? Should helmets be required? What are the pros and cons of legislating safety equipment? Is there a difference between making kids wear one versus adults?

Avalanche Control at Crystal Mountain

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Seeing a big avalanche in person can kind of change your perspective. In many ways I wish that I could take skiers and riders along with me when I do avalanche control so they can hear the sound of a roaring slide, listen to trees break and watch the destructive force of a big slide. Because once you’ve seen a slope fail, the entire snowpack come crashing down through trees and scraping the surface clean, you will never want to duck a rope again. Below is a video of the avalanche on Sunday March 9th at Crystal Mountain in the slide path known as Employee Housing.

With all the rain on Saturday and continued warm temperatures on Sunday, the avalanche hazard spiked in the Cascades. At Crystal, the patrol closed avalanche prone slopes and used explosives to set off some big slides. In Bear Pits a large slide wrapped around from Shot 1 and ran along the rope line that runs above Downhill. The crown was about 6 feet deep and took out timber.

Slidepath known as "Employee Housing" at Crystal

Slidepath known as “Employee Housing” at Crystal

I posted a photo on Facebook of another avalanche in the slide path known as “Employee Housing”. One of the comments gave me pause. It said, “Unfortunately, I’ve seen people ducking ropes to get back there when it’s closed.”

This is a problem.

We don’t close slopes for our own good. We close terrain for a number of reasons. Most importantly, we keep avalanche prone slopes closed during high hazard. We close terrain when we are using explosives to start avalanches. Today was one of those days.

Fortunately no one ducked the ropes in either Employee Housing or the two other domains we controlled on Sunday (Bear Pits and Rock Face).

Bear Pits avalanche that wrapped around and took out part of the rope line.

Bear Pits avalanche that wrapped around and took out part of the rope line.

You might think that ducking a rope to ski or ride just on the other side of the ropes is okay. Kind of a gray area. Again, that’s not the case. The Bear Pits results prove that. So did the Employee Housing slide.

The moral of the story is this: avalanche hazard is high right now. Don’t duck ropes. Be careful in the backbountry. Give mother nature the respect she’s due.

Six Foot Crown in Bear Pits

Six Foot Crown in Bear Pits