Surfing Behind a Yacht

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I’m here to tell you, surfing behind a yacht is amazing fun. While I didn’t make it out for this session on Lake Washington, the video below, put together by the great guys at Stohke, shows a little bit of the ridiculousness. And I thought yachts were for retirees. Silly me.

 

All-Woman Skiing Posse=Best Thing Ever

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As a woman and as a skier, I’m here to tell you something. Skiing with a group of ripping women is fun. It’s real fun. It’s pinch-yourself-in-your-thigh-cause-you’re-not-even-sure-life-is-supposed-to-be-this-fun kind of fun. I grew up chasing my older sister around the slopes, and so I know something else to be true. If those fellow skiers are just a little bit better than you (or a LOT better than you, let’s face it) your skills improve fast.

The old Chair 6, Christy and Kim

The old Chair 6, Christy and Kim

As a ski industry person, I want to promote women skiers. We are half the population for starters. Since last I checked skiing is more dudes than chicks, I’ve often wondered how to get more women into the sport. If I had a snowflake for every time I heard, “I used to ski, before I had kids,” then I’d have a full-blown powder day on my hands.

So what gives?

Lel Tone and Kim Kircher

Hanging with Lel Tone 

Maybe women just don’t know how much fun you can have on skis. Whether you’re skiing solo, taking the kids for a lap on the bunny hill, searching for powder with your husband/boyfriend/co-worker or slicing arcs across the groomers, skiing is just fun. Plain and simple.

Kim Kircher and Corinne Mariethoz

Me and Corinne 

But here’s another thing. This is a secret, so you’ll have to lean in close.

Skiing with women is even better. Don’t tell my husband I said that. No hard feelings JK, you’re a lot of fun too. But skiing with a posse of ladies makes me bolder. It makes me relish just a little longer in the sheer joy of the thing.

Don’t worry. I’m not going to get all poetic about the pure experience of the sport. We are still too far away from the start of the season to go there. But you get the gist.

Getting the Girls Out at Crystal Mountain

Getting the Girls Out at Crystal Mountain

This is why I’m looking forward to watching Unicorn Picnic’s Pretty Faces film. Lyndsey Dyer is on a mission to introduce more women to the sport. She spearheaded shejumps.org, an organization dedicated to increasing female participation in outdoor activities. Lyndsey hopes to provide women of all ages and abilities a, “source of inspiration through a unique look at what is possible when boundaries are broken, dreams captured and friendships cultivated.” Check out the trailer below and prepare to get inspired.

 

 

What’s So Cool About Gazex?

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Exciting, new avalanche control technology is coming to Crystal this season. Three Gazex exploders are currently being installed in Powder Bowl, and if you’re not familiar with the technology, you’ll have to trust me on this one. Gazex is cool.

Why?

Because nothing says all-caps AWESOME like a fiery ball of gas setting off an avalanche. That’s two Hollywood-style special effects for the price of one. Let’s call it the Powder Bowl Two-fer.

Gazex Explosion

So what is Gazex?

Here’s the official marketing speak from the maker’s of Gazex (T.A.S). website:

Gazex is a powerful, permanent remote avalanche control systems. Gazex operates without explosives: the blast is caused by the detonation of a propane and oxygen mixture. The exploders are connected to a central gas shelter capable of storing sufficient gas reserves for the entire season.

Essentially it breaks down like this: a few squirts (and by “squirts” I mean a highly scientific mixture) of propane and O2 are blended in the exploder tube and lit on fire. This is the kind of thing ten-year-old boys’ dreams are made of. A blast of fire explodes from the tip of the tube and points straight down at the snow. This, in turn, will start an avalanche if conditions are right. If not, just like with explosives AC (Avalanche Control), the slope is deemed safe enough to ride.

These exploders are permanent installations. For this reason, Gazex isn’t going to be replacing the ski patrol avalanche teams anytime soon (phew!). Instead, our goal is to use Gazex in places like PB and possibly Rock Face–avalanche paths that overhang heavily trafficked pistes. The Gazex exploders are triggered remotely, which means that the patrol can fire them off quickly and if the hazard ramps up during a storm.

Our Powder Bowl Gazex exploders won’t necessarily mean that Southback is going to open anytime sooner. But they will help us expedite our “in-area” Avalanche Control, keep our snowcat drivers safer and help to mitigate avalanche hazard in Powder Bowl.

Most importantly, Gazex is simply going to be cool to watch.

Blaine preparing concrete in Powder Bowl

Blaine preparing concrete in Powder Bowl

Ski Area Operator’s Worst Nightmare

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You might have seen this one on Unofficial Networks. Basically it’s your worst nightmare. The title is Every Skiers Nightmare, but really this is every ski operator’s nightmare too. One big gust of wind and that cable comes right off the line. Scary stuff. Chairlifts in N. America are regulated by a tram board. One of the basic requirements on all chairlifts is that the sheeve assemblies (the little wheels that the cable rides on) have a cable catcher that doesn’t allow this to happen. I’m not even sure how this is possible. But it’s ugly.

Deropement

This is what it looks like without a cable catcher.

 

 

 

 

Last week in Slovakia a flood and subsequent landslide destroyed the base area of Vråtna ski area. This one, too, sent a chill down my spine. According to the ski area’s Facebook page, no one was injured. But several million dollars worth of damage has been done to the ski area. Those Dopplemeyer gondolas don’t come cheap.

Gondola cabins inundated with landslide

Gondola cabins inundated with landslide

Vråtna's Gondola gets destroyed in landslide

Vråtna’s Gondola gets destroyed in landslide

 

 

Another B Lot Boy Featured in Powder: Steve Fratella

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Photo by Matt Small

Photo by Matt Small

Julie Brown at Powder.com continued recently with her Pay It Forward interview series in which she finds the true locals in the ski/snowboard world, asks them a few soulful questions and then has them choose the next interviewee.

I love this series not only because she started at Crystal, but more importantly because these are the true heroes of our sport.

Her first interview was with Crystal Mountain’s Hugh Gren. Hugh paid it forward to Steve and the resulting interview can now be found at Powder.

People like Hugh and Steve aren’t skiing for sponsors. They aren’t posting their best runs to YouTube or even wearing POV cameras. On the chairlift, these guys aren’t worried about the battery life on their GoPro.

They’re scoping their next line.

They go to the mountains to ski, to hang out with their friends, and have fun. They aren’t there to burnish their image or work on their brand or post impossibly filtered photos to Instagram.

It’s no surprise, really, that Julie’s first two interviews were Crystal locals. Many of these guys and gals stay for weeks in trailers in B Lot, Crystal’s big parking lot ringed on one side with RV parking. A handful of the most colorful locals are known, simply, as the B Lot Boys.

Photo by Matt Small

Photo by Matt Small

Steve Fratella is the real deal. He’s been at Crystal for as many seasons as I have. He skis hard and flies well under the radar, and I’m thrilled to see him showcased in my favorite magazine. Thanks Steve for keeping it real.

 

 

Lyndsey Dyer’s Story of the Skier Girl

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This is the time of year when ski and snowboard film producers start to put out teasers of upcoming films. Powder Magazine recently published a collection of the latest trailers (they’re calling it Trailer Park) and will be updating it  as new ones become available.

I’m especially excited about Pretty Faces, by Unicorn Picnic. This all-women film looks to be one of the best of the season. Check out the official trailer below.

 

The Film

Pretty Faces is a film celebrating women who thrive in the snow. The concept for the film was originated by professional big mountain skier and SheJumps co-founder, Lynsey Dyer with the objective of giving women and girls, young and old, a source of inspiration through a unique look at what is possible when boundaries are broken, dreams captured and friendships cultivated. In Lynsey’s words “I wanted to give young girls something positive to look up to…I wanted to give them their Blizzard of Ahhs, Ski Movie or High Life, but done in a way that also shows the elegance, grace, community and style that is unique to women in the mountains.”

Their Mission

Young girls need more positive role models to offer then an alternative to the world of skinny jeans, reality TV and fashion magazines. Unicorn Picnic aims to provide a positive source of inspiration for young girls first and foremost. The lessons learned on the mountain parallel those learned by many women who take the path less traveled. Their documentary ski film (Pretty Faces) will showcase women walking that path to deliver the message “If she can do it, then so can I.”

 

Update: The New Chair 6

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Vertol Helicopter putting the final touches on the bullweel.

Vertol Helicopter putting the final touches on the bullweel. PC Andrew Longstreth

A few months ago, I had to break some very bad news to my husband that. “Honey, we broke your chairlift.” This is much harder than telling your husband that you dented the car. Or that you ran over his bike shoes. Or that you burned those thick New York steaks he bought special at Costco. Because I’ve had to do all those things too. This one is much, much worse. Not that he was openly upset. My husband is a cool cucumber. But still.

The new view at the top of 6. FC Jim Jarnagin

The new view at the top of 6. PC Jim Jarnagin

I also told him that he’d thank me some day, and I’ve even had to remind him of this a few times since the avalanche we set off killed the chair. Maybe not that first day when the snow was piled up thirty feet under the now destroyed lift. And maybe not in the days since then as the replacement costs have begun to create their own little debris pile.

Today, however, things are finally looking up. With beautiful weather and a really big helicopter, anything is possible. The crews flew the old towers and bullwheels out and brought in the new bullwheel. And everything fit. Lunch was open at the Summit House and plenty of patrons got a front row seat.

Out with the old and in with the new. I suppose it’s true that everything does happen for a reason.

Now I’m counting down the days until first ride on the new Chair 6. The view at the top of the new lift is looking pretty darn good.